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Videos of Value

Before these links have been listed they have been shared with others and received notable praise. The concept of rites of passage is complex. The deeper you travel on a path of inquiry the more layers can become exposed and put into service for individuals, their communities and the planet. I welcome your thoughts on these links. In the service of advancing knowledge in the area of youth and community development through rites of passage I invite you to share other resources that you have found helpful in this area. Please send them to thecenter@rope.org.

 


 

The Human Journey
Duane Elgin presents a mini-documentary that looks at human development through the lens of “The Hero’s Journey.” What stage are we in: separation, initiation, or return?
(video sited from: www.greattransitionstories.com)


 

On Becoming an Adult
An interview with Joseph Campbell: Myth lets you know where you are across the ages of life...
(video sited from: www.greattransitionstories.com)


 

The Hero's Journey
Here is a contemporary description of Campbell's monomyth drawing from scenes from modern films.
(video sited from: www.greattransitionstories.com)


 

The Power of Words
Creating a new paradigm starts with changing the words we use to communicate. If you ever doubted the power of language to change the world, we'd like to share this video with you. It's only 1:48 minutes long and well-worth watching.


 

Rites of Passage - Echoes of the Ancestors
Pictures from around the world document celebrations and rituals surrounding all major life events, birth, coming of age, marriage and death. Evidence of rites of passage date back 40,000 years. Evolutionary biologists claim that species will not maintain behaviors nonessential for their survival. Why then, if not for our survival, have humans maintained rites of passage for thousands of years?

The primary purpose of rites of passage is to transmit values and ethics to children that inform and guide expectations for behaviors essential to survival. Rites of passage have served survival and there is no greater need for them now then ever.

For more information and a users guide for the Echoes of the Ancestors – contact: thecenter@rope.org


 

It Takes A Whole Village To Raise A Child
It takes a whole village to raise a child is a very popular phrase. But, what does it mean? How did the whole village raise a child?

The answer lies in the anthropological records and archeological artifacts of human beings. Rites of passage were the way our species raised their children, especially helping transmit essential knowledge and skills for the survival of their tribe and protection of their environment. We still have this knowledge stored deep in our bones. We need guidance and supports to re-member and to reconnect these important life-sustaining practices in our communities. It’s for the future of us all and the future of the planet.

This educational video depicts a parent/student orientation. It is phase I of ROPE® and the initial separation of parents from their children entering their Rite Of Passage Experience© ROPE®. This is a three-part multi-year youth & community development strategy. It begins with parents and their children transitioning from primary to secondary school, when they are between 11-12 years old. Parents are introduced to the concepts of ROPE® and expected to become the whole village that raises their children. Children become initiates and are preparing to leave childhood behind.

This Educational Videos Series is part of our continued effort to make available information about a new discipline we are calling: youth and community development through rites of passage. The purpose is to help us remember the way a whole village came together to raise their children. While these videos are available to the public they are designed to be a companion to other written materials and consultation. To have access to the whole story contact The Center at: thecenter@rope.org -

For more information and a users guide for the It takes a whole village to raise a child contact: thecenter@rope.org


 

Teaching Children Self-Reliance: Teaching Parents To Let Go
One of the most difficult parts of parenting is letting go of their children as they enter adolescence. Rites of passage create clear expectations and a pathway for parents to intentionally and gradually let their children go. This is critical. It fosters their child’s self-reliance while bringing in the support of community elders. Parents frequently struggle with letting go of their children. It is natural. Children need to have experiences, with other adults, where they can learn skills, test their competencies and find inner resources to feel safe and competent when exploring their world.

This session also give youth and opportunity to explore the skills, attitudes and behaviors necessary to learn anything. It is a pivotal session in the Initiation of Scholars© that has considerable evidence demonstrating its success in helping increase student academic achievement. It also brings youth into an intentional encounter with their environment to learn about it as natural relationships rather than natural resource that they have authority over. Teaching children compass skills helps them develop an attunement with their environment and form a relationship with the four directions, North, East, South and West.

This educational video depicts a session in Phase I of ROPE®. Parents are included, but not the parents whose children are in that particular ROPE® group. It illustrates a village coming together to raise each other’s children. It also intensifies, through experience the challenge of parents separating from their children.

ROPE® is a three-part multi-year youth & community development strategy It begins with parents and their children transitioning from primary to secondary school, when they are between 11-12 years old. Parents are introduced to the concepts of ROPE® and expected to become the whole village that raises their children. Children become initiates and are preparing to leave childhood behind.

This Educational Videos Series is part of our continued effort to make available information about a new discipline we are calling: youth and community development through rites of passage. The purpose is to help us remember the way a whole village came together to raise their children. While these videos are available to the public they are designed to be a companion to other written materials and consultation. To have access to the whole story contact The Center at: thecenter@rope.org

For more information and a users guide for the Teaching children self-reliance: Teaching parents to let go – contact: thecenter@rope.org


 

Our Totem Is The Raven (1972)
This is a vintage educational film that I’ve used for many years. It features legendary Elder, Wisdom Keeper and Movie star Chief Dan George.

Grandpa – Chief Dan George – sees that his grandson - David is changing and wants to take him back to their ancestral lands. This is traditionally how the “initiatory cohort” was convened, i.e. children seemed to be growing up, ungovernable and in need of an initiation.

It offers clear examples of the integration of many of the 20 elements in the architectural design for youth and community development through rites of passage.

I use a variety of mediums and experiences to unveil the design principles for rites of passage. In this way people who desire to become “Elders” can begin to understand and use their creative imagination – dreams – in the “co-creation” of what would be appropriate rites of passage for their culture and community’s children.

For more information and a users guide for Our Totem Is The Raven and other educational materials for youth and community development through rites of passage – contact: thecenter@rope.org


A key ingredient for raising healthy children is a sense of community and a sense of belonging that are nurtured through strong relationships among residents. Strengthening relationships between people in a community can be inspired by introducing a new and compelling “Story”. A Story that residents can identify with and that promotes caring and conversation.

Changing the story can change the future. But, it’s not that easy. People need to become engaged and identify with the characters in the story and the messages, values and ideals inherent in the story so that the story becomes a guide to inform residents, youth and adults how to live their lives. Live their lives in ways that are mutually beneficial, where residents feel needed and cared for and promotes the health and well-being of everyone.

The “rite” story can become deeply embedded in an individual when they participate in a community-oriented rite of passage. Theater is ritual. All theater is initiatory and a rite of passage for the participants. Each member of the community of players takes on a new role, becomes transformed by acting to new ways of believing and being. Then, engaged in conversation, sometimes a World Café, residents explore lessons learned from the story and how to put those lessons into practice. Even the story of a “Rite Of Passage Experience,” handed down from generation to generation in the practices of cultures, religions, civic groups, political process and communities can generate strong emotions and compel residents to investigate a central question: “How are the children?” and explore other opportunities.

“Bigger Than You Think” is a play, crafted by stories solicited from people in a community to share the different ways people experienced growing up. From these stores similarities of helpful experiences were described and noted. Almost all of these similarities of experiences that were helpful to residents growing up were related to Developmental Assets. And, here’s the story... “When we get our story rite we get our future right”.

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Conversations – from the Latin – conversatinoem (conversation) “act of living with,” – conversari “to live with, keep company with,” literally “turn about with.”

To arrange a free 18 minute phone conversation with Dr. Blumenkrantz, e-mail us at: thecenter@rope.org or call: 860-633-5349. Conversations and ongoing support can be arranged. Subsequent conversations are $50 per half hour and $100 per hour.

If you are unsure, contact us so we can decide together what might be possible through conversations on questions that matter to you. The fee is negotiable, if necessary.